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ATRIAL FIBRILLATION



ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

Definition
Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm. The heart’s electrical system normally sends regularly spaced signals.

These signals tell the heart muscle to contract or beat.

The heart has two upper chambers called atria. It also has two lower chambers called ventricles. Each signal starts in the atria and travels to the rest of the heart. The electrical signals from the atria are fast and irregular when you have atrial fibrillation. The atria shake instead of contract. Some signals do not reach the ventricles and the ventricles continue pumping. This pumping is usually irregular and sometimes rapid. This rhythm can reduce the heart’s ability
to pump blood out to the body.

Blood left in the heart chambers can form clots. These clots may sometimes break away and travel to the brain. This can cause stroke.


The best treatment
If you have atrial fibrillation; don’t worry you are not alone.
Don’t worry – we can help.
​There are over 6.1 million of you in the USA.
Here at Cardiac Arrhythmia Service we have a structured approach to deal with atrial fibrillation. We may recommend a cardioversion, medications or an ablation procedure. We are highly experienced and have successfully performed over 1,000 ablations.
What happens during AFib?
Normally, your heart contracts and relaxes to a regular beat. In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart (the atria) beat irregularly (quiver) instead of beating effectively to move blood into the ventricles.

If a clot breaks off, enters the bloodstream and lodges in an artery leading to the brain, a stroke results. About 15–20 percent of people who have strokes have this heart arrhythmia. This clot risk is why patients with this condition are put on blood thinners.
Even though untreated atrial fibrillation doubles the risk of heart-related deaths and is associated with a 5-fold increased risk for stroke, many patients are unaware that AFib is a serious condition.

According to the 2009 “Out of Sync” survey:
Only 33% of AF patients think atrial fibrillation is a serious condition
Less than half of AF patients believe they have an increased risk for stroke or heart-related hospitalizations or death

AFib Treatment Saves Lives & Lowers Risks
If you or someone you love has atrial fibrillation, learn more about what AFib is, why treatment can save lives, and what you can do to reach your goals, lower your risks and live a healthy life.

If you think you may have atrial fibrillation, here are your most important steps:
Know the Atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF) is a quivering or irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. At least 6.1 million Americans are living with AFib.

Here’s how patients have described their experience:

“My heart flip-flops, skips beats, and feels like it’s banging against my chest wall, especially if I’m carrying stuff up my stairs or bending down.”
“I was nauseated, light-headed, and weak. I had a really fast heartbeat and felt like I was gasping for air.”
“I had no symptoms at all. I discovered my AF at a regular check-up. I’m glad we found it early.”
What happens during AFib?
atrial fibrillationNormally, your heart contracts and relaxes to a regular beat. In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart (the atria) beat irregularly (quiver) instead of beating effectively to move blood into the ventricles.

If a clot breaks off, enters the bloodstream and lodges in an artery leading to the brain, a stroke results. About 15–20 percent of people who have strokes have this heart arrhythmia. This clot risk is why patients with this condition are put on blood thinners.

Even though untreated atrial fibrillation doubles the risk of heart-related deaths and is associated with a 5-fold increased risk for stroke, many patients are unaware that AFib is a serious condition.

According to the 2009 “Out of Sync” survey:

Only 33% of AF patients think atrial fibrillation is a serious condition
Less than half of AF patients believe they have an increased risk for stroke or heart-related hospitalizations or death
AFib Treatment Saves Lives & Lowers Risks
If you or someone you love has atrial fibrillation, learn more about what AFib is, why treatment can save lives, and what you can do to reach your goals, lower your risks and live a healthy life.

Excerpted from the American Heart Association

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Cardiac Arrhythmia Services

We are sometimes referred to as the electricians of the heart. We treat all types of heart rhythm disorders: hearts that beat slowly, quickly or erratically. We evaluate patients with palpitations to help diagnose the etiology of palpitations and then cure the underlying problem. In addition to palpitations, shortness of breath, fatigue, anxiety, dizziness (syncope) are some other manifestations of arrhythmia.

Common arrhythmias that we deal with are atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). We usually try medication to treat arrhythmias but when medications are insufficient we may recommend an ablation procedure.

There are different types of ablation but they all aim at eliminating the source of the arrhythmia. Our practice is at the forefront of technology and we use the newest techniques and equipment available to provide the safest and most effective therapy to our patients. We implant and manage all types of pacemakers and defibrillators. We have one of the largest and most efficient remote monitoring programs in the state of Florida. Remote monitoring allows us to watch over and treat our patients in between their office visits. At Cardiac Arrhythmia Services we have 3 cardiac electrophysiologists, 2 physician assistants, 2 remote monitoring technicians, 3 nurses and a staff of 19 people who all work together on daily basis to ensure that our patients get the best care possible.

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